Overhead Rigging: Chain Motors; Truss; and Weight Distribution

Chain motors and truss are becoming common on our sets. While the rigging of chain motors and trussing is frequently performed by Local 80 Grips, we are often hanging tons of lights, cable, and equipment on them. It is essential that we know the fundamental principles on how this equipment operates, functions, and physics behind it. This class will instruct you on selecting this equipment and give you the skills to know when it is near its capacity as well as the use of appropriate fall protection and wire rope ladders. With chain motors, we will be looking at the various sizes and models available, including their capacities, safety features, and control characteristics.Trussing will focus on the various styles available to the Set Lighting Crew and the benefits and advantages of each style as well as the basic rules of assembly. Loading a truss is something that should not be taken for granted. Since the load on a truss is normally not equally distributed between points, it can be a simple thing to overload the capacity of a motor. We will also go over the operation and spotting of chain motor rigs. A rig that is out of balance can quickly overload the capacity of the system and result in a catastrophic failure.